Recruiting and retaining key employees is important to every company, and a company's health benefit program is a key part of the compensation they offer to their employees. Due to the rising costs of traditional employer-sponsored health insurance, Defined Contribution Health Plans are gaining popularity in the U.S.

Defined Contribution Resources

How the QSEHRA Works for Employees

In this eBook, we go over exactly how the QSEHRA applies to employees no matter their current insurance situation.

Health Reimbursement Report 2017

Download this report to see charts showing data for industry, family status, region to see if a QSEHRA will work for you.

The Comprehensive Guide to the Small Business HRA

Everything you need to know about the new QSEHRA. Including cost comparisons, case studies, and other tools.

Stay Informed

What Is a Defined Contribution Health Plan?

Rather than paying the costs to provide a specific group health plan benefit (a "defined benefit"), employers fix their costs on a monthly basis by establishing a Defined Contribution Health Plan.

The general concept of a Defined Contribution Health Plan is that a company gives each employee a fixed dollar amount (a "Defined Contribution") that the employees choose how to spend. Typically, employees are allowed to use their Defined Contribution allowance to reimburse themselves for individual health insurance costs.

Defined Contribution Health Plans are an affordable alternative to employer-sponsored group health insurance plans. Defined Contribution Health Plans by themselves are not health insurance plans.

Defined Contribution Health Plans are programs that allow employees to be more involved in their healthcare choices. With a Defined Contribution Health Plan, employees are responsible for selecting an individual health insurance plan and making payments out of their own finances.

The sections outlined on our navigation bar provide more information about Defined Contribution Health Plans.

Happy reading, and click here to contact us for more information!

Use Cases for Defined Contribution Health Plans

The term Defined Contribution is a big buzzword in the health benefits industry. This section provides an overview of what Defined Contribution Health Plans are, and how they are used.

Defined Benefit vs. Defined Contribution

First, let's start with a concept most people are familiar with. In the retirement space, Defined Contribution is a type of retirement savings plan in which the amount of the employer's annual contribution is specified, such as with a 401(k). Compare this to a pension plan where the employer specifies the benefit (a defined benefit).

In healthcare, the same logic is followed. A Defined Contribution Health Plan is a type of health plan in which the amount of the employer's annual contribution to employees' healthcare (Ex: individual health insurance policies) is specified. Compare this to a group health plan where the employer specifies the group health insurance plan (again, a defined benefit).

How Defined Contribution Health Plans Work

Defined Contribution Health Plans offer an alternative to “defined benefit” group health insurance plans. Just as employers realized the savings associated with moving away from defined benefit retirement pensions and toward Defined Contribution 401(k)s, many businesses are applying this model to their health benefits programs.

The general strategy of a Defined Contribution Health Plan is that:

  • The employer implements a Section 105 Medical Reimbursement Plan to give each employee a fixed monthly healthcare allowance to spend on an individual health plan.
  • Employees select and purchase the individual or family health plan of their choice. Employees may purchase their own policy directly from any health insurance company, through a broker, or from the state Health Insurance Marketplaces.
  • The employer reimburses employees up to the amount of their Defined Contribution allowance.

Defined Contribution Health Plans by themselves are not health insurance plans. Defined Contribution plans give the employer control of benefits, while giving employees choice and a great benefit.

Why Defined Contribution Health Plans Work

Defined Contribution Health Plans work for employers and employees because:

  • Individual health insurance cost 20% - 60% less than comparable group health coverage. The employer’s healthcare dollars go farther.
  • Contributions are tax-deductible to the employer, and employees receive reimbursements tax-free.
  • The employer gains fiscal control and predictability over their health benefits budget.
  • There are no minimum or maximum contribution amounts, and no minimum participation requirements.
  • Employees have choice in health insurance plans and make consumer-driven choices.
  • Employees have access to the federal individual health insurance tax subsidies through the Health Insurance Marketplaces.

Other Variations of Defined Contribution Health Plans

So, how else is the term "Defined Contribution Health Plan" being used? One popular variation is a type of Defined Contribution within group health insurance offerings.

With a group-based Defined Contribution model, the business sets an amount to contribute to employees' health insurance premiums, but provides a limited menu of group health insurance options (for example, employees choose from 2-5 insurance policies). This type of "employee choice" group health insurance offering is common with larger businesses. It is also one of the features that some state small business SHOP Marketplaces offer to small businesses as part of health care reform.

Tip: In this guide on Defined Contribution Health Plans we are focusing on a “Pure” Defined Health Plan model, paired with individual health insurance.

Design Requirements for Defined Contribution Health Plans

There are three key questions to ask when designing your Defined Contribution Health Plan. These three questions will help you customize a plan that achieves your employee health benefit goals (and meets your budget).

  1. When will the plan year start?

Your company will decide when your Defined Contribution Health Plan will start.

  1. What monthly allowance amounts will you provide?

You probably already have a budget in mind for health benefits. Within this budget, how will you divide up employees' monthly allowances?

You can provide the same monthly allowance amount to all employees, or you can provide different monthly allowances to different types of employees. This is also called employee classes. Classes must be based on bona-fide job criteria such as job title, location, etc. You can also vary the allowance amounts by family status (single, married, etc.) within an employee class.

For example, you could provide $300/month to Senior Programmers and $150/month to Administrative staff.

Following this example, you could add a layer of family status allowances. For the Senior Programmers you could provide $300/month to single participants, $350/month to married participants, and $400/month to married with children participants.

  1. When are employees eligible for the plan?

What criteria makes employees eligible to participate in the Defined Contribution Health Plan? For example, do they need to work a certain amount of hours weekly, have a certain job title, or be employed for a certain number of days? (Note: the maximum waiting period is 90 days). These criteria will set employee eligibility for the Defined Contribution Health Plan.

Compliance Requirements for Defined Contribution Health Plans

Defined Contribution Health Plans that use a Section 105 Medical Reimbursement Plan as the foundation are considered group health plans. As such, they must comply with IRS, HIPAA, COBRA,  ERISA, and the Affordable Care Act (ACA) rules.

This section details compliance requirements that may impact your Defined Contribution Health Plan.

Tip: Use a Defined Contribution Software Administrator to make compliance easy.Compliance_requirements_defined_contribution_health_plan

Internal Revenue Service (IRS)

  • Plan Documents: The IRS requires that written Plan Documents are established and maintained. Plan Documents define what expenses are eligible for reimbursement, the amount of employer contribution, and other required details about the reimbursement plan.

  • Documentation: The IRS requires that employees submit proper documentation verifying their claim for reimbursement, and that supporting documentation is saved on file for ten years.

  • Non-Discrimination: Defined Contribution Health Plans must comply with IRS nondiscrimination rules. The rules state the plan must not discriminate in favor of highly compensated individuals (HCIs) with respect to eligibility to participate in the plan or benefits provided under the plan.

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)

  • HIPAA Privacy Rules: Defined Contribution Health Plans are governed by HIPAA Privacy Rules. In order to administer a Plan correctly, the entity processing employee reimbursement claims receives Protected Health Information (PHI) that is required to be held confidentially under HIPAA.

Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA)

Only for plans with 20 or more participants

  • COBRA Compliance:  Employers must give terminated employees the option to continue their participation in the Defined Contribution Health Plan for a period after termination, and may charge an employee up to 102% of the value of their allowance if COBRA is elected.

Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA)

  • Summary Plan Description: Defined Contribution Health Plans are employee welfare plans under ERISA. ERISA requires every [welfare] plan to have a Summary Plan Description (SPD) and to furnish copies to each participant.

  • ERISA Compliance: The U.S. federal government has specific regulations employers must comply with in order to reimburse employees for individual health insurance premiums without triggering ERISA plan status for the individual health insurance policies. For example, the employer must not endorse specific individual health insurance policies or pay directly for them.

Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA)

  • Annual Limit Compliance: Section 2711 of the Public Health Services (“PHS”) Act, as added by the ACA, provides that no annual or lifetime limits may be placed on essential health benefits (“EHB”). PHS Act 2711 provides that annual limits and lifetime limits may be placed on benefits that are not EHB, such as health insurance premiums. Defined Contribution Health Plans must be designed to comply with PHS 2711.

  • Preventive Care Compliance: Section 2713 of the PHS Act, as added by the ACA, requires group health plans (including Defined Contribution Health Plans) to cover basic preventive health services without cost-sharing.

  • 90-Day Waiting Period Compliance: The ACA prohibits waiting periods over 90 days for eligible employees.

  • Internal and External Claims Appeal Process: The ACA added new requirements to the internal and external appeal process including how and when procedures are communicated to plan participants.

  • Dependent Coverage for Adult Children up to Age 26: Section 2714 of the PHS Act, as added by the ACA, provides that group health plans (including Defined Contribution Health Plans) that make available dependent coverage of children must make such coverage available for children until 26 years of age.

  • Uniform Explanation of Coverage and Definitions: The ACA requires that group health plans, participants, and beneficiaries receive a standardized summary of benefits and coverage (“SBC”) and a set of uniform definitions (“Uniform Glossary”), both of which must conform to requirements outlined in the ACA and existing regulations.

  • Form 720 Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER) Fee: The ACA includes a "research fee" that plan sponsors must pay on an annual basis annually via Form 720.

  • 60-Day Notice of Material Modification: The ACA requires employers to provide 60 days advanced notice to participants when making material modifications to their group health plan (including Defined Contribution Health Plans).

Defined Contribution Health Plan Implementation Strategies

This section outlines how to implement a Defined Contribution Health Plan.

How to Implement a Defined Contribution Health Plan

There are five simple steps to implement a Defined Contribution Health Plan.

Step 1: Do not offer a group health insurance plan.  

Step 2: Define any amount you can afford for health benefits, and use Defined Contribution Software to give each employee a fixed dollar allowance to use for individual health insurance.  

Step 3: Select an Insurance Professional, and/or provide information about the Health Insurance Marketplaces to help employees shop for and purchase individual health policies.  

Step 4: Educate employees about the Defined Contribution Health Plan, and about the advantages of individual health insurance.

Step 5: Use Defined Contribution Software to reimburse employees via payroll.

How to Administer a Defined Contribution Health Plan

To administer a Defined Contribution Health Plan you need to:

  • Have legal, written Section 105 Plan Documents, and
  • Have safeguards in place to stay compliant with the IRS, ERISA, HIPAA, and the ACA.

Businesses have three main options for plan administration:

  1. A traditional third party administrator ("TPA")
  2. A Defined Contribution Administration Software provider
  3. Self-administration

Because of compliance reasons, and for ease of use and time savings, most businesses use a third party to administer the plan.

In the next section, we’ll discuss Defined Contribution Administration Software in more detail.

Administration Software for a Defined Contribution Health Plan

Defined Contribution Health Plans are an alternative to traditional employer-sponsored health benefits, allowing companies to reimburse employees for individual health insurance. Employers use a Defined Contribution Administration provider to stay compliant, and to make administration easy.

As you evaluate Defined Contribution Administration Software providers, keep in mind these 14 features to expect from your provider.

1. Employee Education & On-Boarding

While this first feature isn’t entirely a "software" feature, it is one of the most important considerations of offering a Defined Contribution Health Plan: employee education and company on-boarding. The Defined Contribution Administration provider should provide you a toolkit to help your company:

  • Understand the benefit (What is Defined Contribution? How does it work?)
  • Understand the benefits of individual health insurance
  • Learn how to request reimbursement and use their participant portal

Because even when the benefits are awesome, many employees are not familiar with choosing their own policies - and change can be hard. For this reason, look for a Defined Contribution Administration provider that:

  • Provides custom on-boarding process for your company
  • Provides an instant and electronic way to send Welcome Kits to employees
  • Provides an online help and support center with tutorials for employees and the company administrator
  • Has a responsive and helpful support team knowledgeable about Defined Contribution and health care reform

2. Employee Allowances

The Defined Contribution Administration Software should allow you to give employees their allowances monthly or at any time on an exception basis—with automatic monitoring of HIPAA and ERISA discrimination compliance rules. Deferred allowances (a waiting period) should be possible for new hires, and suspended allowances should be allowed for former employees that employers hope to re-hire on a seasonal basis.

3. Reimbursement Requests Submission

Employees should be able to submit requests for reimbursement online, by fax, or by mail, and immediately receive an email acknowledging their request and providing an online link to monitor status. Documentation should be permanently available online for convenient access by employees.

4. Reimbursement Request Processing

The Defined Contribution Administration provider should process reimbursement requests within 24 hours and employees should be able to inquire about their claim via online chat, email, fax, mail, or telephone. No request should be rejected for improper or incomplete submission without multiple contacts. All employee contact should leave clear audit trails and meet appropriate regulatory guidelines (e.g. ACA, IRS, HIPAA, ERISA, SAS 70). Look for software that provides “real-time” tracking on requests, available online 24/7.

5. Reimbursement     

Employees should receive email notification when their reimbursement request is approved and again confirming when (and how) it is reimbursed. Reimbursement should be administered individually or on a periodic batch basis via check, payroll addition, or direct deposit leaving a clear and permanently-available audit trail.

6. Employee Ledger  

All employees should have access to an online ledger showing their current balance, allowance, requests, and reimbursements including permanent storage of receipts, relevant tax information, Plan Documents, and the ability to save or export their own medical information via the administration platform.

7. Integrated Electronic Plan Documents, SPD, and Employee Signature

The Plan Document, Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC), and SPD (Summary Plan Description) should be electronically created, readily accessible online, and signatures should be collected electronically. Employers should be able to administer a change to benefits for any specific Class of Employees at any time and the electronic documents should automatically change and, where required, new electronic signatures should be collected when the employee is next online.

8. Classes of Employees

Employers should be able to instantly create unlimited different Classes of employees with each Class receiving different benefits by employee family status.

9. Employee Enrollment & Termination

Employers should be able to instantly enroll or remove employees in real-time on an individual or batch basis, with automatic printing of employee welcome kits and other appropriate plan administration information.

10. Plan Setup

Employers should be able to completely set up and/or change both their Defined Contribution Health Plan and their Plan Documents simultaneously online.

11. Reporting

Employers should be able to view all reimbursements by employee or by Class of employees, and monitor in real-time claim information for each Class of employees. Employees should be able to see 3-5 prior years of history.

12. Tax Forms and Information

All information for required administration reporting (e.g. 5500 for employers with more than 100 employees) should be available online in real time, and non-eligible plan participants (e.g. independent contractors, owners of Sub S companies) should receive appropriate 1099 information.

13. Personal Health Insurance Distribution          

Defined Contribution Software should automatically provide the employer’s health insurance broker a CRM (Customer Relationship Manager) to best serve their employees—including automatic notification to the broker when an employee’s Defined Contribution plan status changes due to family additions, promotions, etc.

14. HIPAA and ERISA Compliance

The employer should be automatically protected and the plan administration made HIPAA Compliant through technology rather than the training of administering employees. For example, employers should not be able to view HIPAA-protected employee information, and should automatically follow Department of Labor, HIPAA, and ERISA guidelines for employers allowing insurers’ access to their employees.

Frequently Asked Questions about Defined Contribution Health Plans

This section answers frequently asked questions (FAQs) about Defined Contribution Health Plans.

Is there a Maximum Employer Contribution Limit for Defined Contribution Health Plans?

No. There is no limit on the amount of money an employer can contribute to an employee’s Defined Contribution Health Plan. Also, there is no minimum contribution requirement.

In other words, the employer can choose exactly how much money they want to contribute from $0 to an unlimited amount per month.

Is there a Minimum Employer Contribution Requirement for Questions_defined_contribution_health_plansDefined Contribution Health Plans?

No. There is no minimum contribution requirement that employer must contribute to an employee’s Defined Contribution Health Plan. Also, there is no maximum contribution limit.

In other words, the employer can choose exactly how much money they want to contribute from $0 to an unlimited amount per month.

Is There a Minimum Employee Participation Requirement for Defined Contribution Health Plans?

No. There are no minimum participation requirements that a company must meet in order to offer a Defined Contribution Health Plan. Also, there are no maximum participation requirements.

A Defined Contribution Health Plan can be offered by a company of any size even if only one (1) employee chooses to participate.

Is a Company or Employer Required to Fund a Defined Contribution Health Plan in Separate Bank Accounts?

No. Defined Contribution Health Plans do not need to be funded until an actual reimbursement is made. A company is not required to fund any portion of employees' Defined Contributions in separate bank accounts.

In fact, it is recommended that the company keep the Defined Contributions in their own bank accounts (e.g. a general purpose bank account) and handle reimbursements via payroll for maximum savings and control.

Can a Company or Employer Give Employees Different Amounts with Defined Contribution Health Plans?

Yes! With a Defined Contribution Health Plan, an employer can give employees different contributions based on classes of employees. Federal regulations state that “a plan or issuer may treat participants as two or more distinct groups of similarly situated individuals if the distinction between or among the groups of participants is based on a bona fide employment-based classification consistent with the employer's usual business practices.”

To comply with these regulations, employee classes within the Defined Contribution Health Plan must:

  • Be based on bona-fide business differences. These may include job categories, geographic location, part-time or full-time status, date of hire, etc.

  • Treat all “similarly situated” employees equally. By creating classes based on genuine job categories, all employees within a class will be “similarly situated”.

  • Not discriminate against unhealthy people. An employer cannot provide inferior benefits to specific individuals with adverse health conditions.

  • Spell out the requirements for classes and benefits in the ERISA plan document. If, upon audit, a Defined Contribution plan is found to not comply with these rules, then the employer must provide the same level of benefits to all employees, regardless of their class, from the time the plan was created to the date of the violation.

See 29 CFR §2590.702 for more information.

Why Can't Employers Just Pay Directly for Employees' Individual Health Insurance Plans?

Some companies might want to pay directly for an employee's individual health insurance plans without utilizing an ERISA and HIPAA-compliant Defined Contribution Health Plan, but doing so will put the employer out of compliance with federal regulations and increase the employer's (and employee's) tax liability.

There are two major reasons an employer should never pay for its employee's individual health insurance plan:

  1. Federal Compliance Issues - Paying for Individual Health Insurance without a Defined Contribution Plan Causes the Employer to "Endorse" the Individual Health Insurance Plans

  2. Increased Tax Liability - Paying for Individual Health Insurance without a Defined Contribution Plan Causes the Payments to Become Taxable Income to the Employees

How Can Employers Contribute to Individual Health Insurance Plans without Violating Federal Law?

The employer can use an ERISA and HIPAA-compliant Defined Contribution Health Plan to contribute to employees' individual health insurance costs without violating federal law.

The federal government has guidelines for employers who want to contribute to an employee's individual health insurance premiums. Specifically, the employer must take special steps to avoid "employer endorsement" of the individual plans.

To avoid endorsement of individual health insurance plans, compliance includes the following restrictions on the actions of employers:

  1. Employers must not be involved in employees' decision to purchase individual health insurance, or their decision on which insurer or plan to use. They must not get involved in any negotiations with an insurance carrier over price or benefits of individual health insurance plans, and must not provide employees with claim forms or other materials related to their individual health insurance policies.

  2. Employers may not directly pay premiums on individual health insurance policies. They must not receive any compensation from an insurance carrier in connection with an employee's individual health insurance policy.

  3. Employers must not become involved in any claim dispute between an employee and an insurance carrier; all inquiries must be directed to the insurer.

To comply with point (1) above, while still making contributions to a Defined Contribution Health Plan that can reimburse for individual health insurance premiums, employers should follow these additional guidelines:

  1. Employers must not pressure employees to use the Defined Contribution to pay for individual insurance coverage.

  2. In addition to reimbursing for major medical health insurance premiums, employers should also allow the use of funds for qualified supplemental coverage.

  3. Employers must limit their role to simply verifying that a qualified expense (such as an individual health insurance premium) was incurred, and then reimbursing such amount from the Defined Contribution Health Plan.

How Do Defined Contribution Plans Vary by State?

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Alabama

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Alaska

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Arizona

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Arkansas

Defined Contribution Health Plans in California

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Colorado

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Connecticut

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Delaware

Defined Contribution Health Plans in District of Columbia

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Florida

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Georgia

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Hawaii

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Idaho

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Illinois

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Indiana

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Iowa

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Kansas

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Kentucky

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Louisiana

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Maine

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Maryland

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Massachusetts

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Michigan

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Minnesota

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Mississippi

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Missouri

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Montana

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Nebraska

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Nevada

Defined Contribution Health Plans in New Hampshire

Defined Contribution Health Plans in New Jersey

Defined Contribution Health Plans in New Mexico

Defined Contribution Health Plans in New York

Defined Contribution Health Plans in North Carolina

Defined Contribution Health Plans in North Dakota

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Ohio

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Oklahoma

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Oregon

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Pennsylvania

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Rhode Island

Defined Contribution Health Plans in South Carolina

Defined Contribution Health Plans in South Dakota

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Tennessee

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Texas

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Utah

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Vermont

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Virginia

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Washington

Defined Contribution Health Plans in West Virginia

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Wisconsin

Defined Contribution Health Plans in Wyoming

Do you have additional questions on Defined Contribution Health Plans? Contact us. We’d be happy to help.

Defined Contribution Health Plans Additional Reading

4 ObamaCare Changes that Make Defined Contribution Irresistible

ObamaCare. Love it or hate it, one thing is true... the landscape of employer-sponsored health insurance is changing. Many of the Affordable Care Act ("ObamaCare") provisions strongly favor the individual health insurance market, making defined contribution health plans the ideal health insurance solution for most (if not all) US employers. >> Read more.

Can a Company or Employer Give Employees Different Amounts with Defined Contribution Health Plans?

Yes! With a defined contribution health plan, an employer can give employees different contributions based on classes of employees. >> Read more.

Pure Defined Contribution - A Health Insurance Allowance

Pure defined contribution health models are fast becoming popular with small businesses. With pure defined contribution a business contributes a fixed dollar amount (a "defined contribution") toward employees' health insurance costs. A simple way to think about it is providing a health insurance allowance to employees. >> Read more.

Stop Giving Raises for Health Insurance and Start Offering Defined Contribution Allowances (Your Bottom Line Will Thank You)

Many small businesses who do not offer health benefits consider giving employees a raise or salary bonus to help them pay for their individual health insurance. >> Read more.

Why Use Defined Contribution Software?

There are two main reasons why businesses should use Defined Contribution Software to administer their defined contribution plan: 1) Time savings/ease of use, and 2) Tax-savings/compliance. >> Read more.

What is a "Pure" Defined Contribution Health Plan?

Pure defined contribution health plans are fast becoming popular with small businesses as an alternative to group health insurance. With a pure defined contribution plan a business contributes a fixed dollar amount (a "defined contribution") toward employees' health insurance expenses. >> Read more.

How to Pair Defined Contribution with Health Insurance Subsidies for Cost Savings

Many small employers are using a pure defined contribution health plan approach paired with individual health insurance, and the new health insurance subsidies, to create affordable health benefits that employees love. >> Read more.

Pure Defined Contribution vs. SHOP Exchange - Which is Better?

Here's a look at two common small business health insurance approaches: pure defined contribution and group health insurance through the new SHOP exchanges. >> Read more.

Defined Benefit vs. Defined Contribution Healthcare - What's the Difference?

The health insurance industry is transitioning away from defined benefit healthcare and towards defined contribution healthcare. Many experts even say we're approaching the tipping year for defined contribution healthcare. But what do these terms mean and how are they different? >> Read more.

Small Businesses Passing Up SHOP for Individual Exchanges, Defined Contribution

Many small businesses are passing up the small business SHOP exchanges, and opting to send employees to the individual exchanges. Although the small business SHOP exchange may seem attractive on the surface, it is still a group health insurance plan and it doesn't address the core problem that group health insurance is broken. >> Read more.

Pure Defined Contribution: A Small Business Health Insurance Solution

Pure defined contribution health plans provide small businesses a way to offer employees excellent health benefits without the cost or complication of group health insurance. In this article we'll explore where we've been historically with small business health insurance options, and how pure defined contribution health plans provide a solution for small businesses in 2014 and beyond. >> Read more.

A Real-Life Example - Defined Contribution & Health Insurance Subsidies

This health benefits example is meant to illustrate the potential cost savings for small businesses, and for employees, through using a defined contribution approach with the health insurance subsidies. >> Read more.

The Comprehensive Guide to the Small Business HRA